| 
  • If you are citizen of an European Union member nation, you may not use this service unless you are at least 16 years old.

  • You already know Dokkio is an AI-powered assistant to organize & manage your digital files & messages. Very soon, Dokkio will support Outlook as well as One Drive. Check it out today!

View
 

Types of Albinism 2

Page history last edited by Alex Gregory 14 years, 8 months ago

Home Page

Oculocutaneous:

·         Most common type of albinism

·         Affects the hair, skin, and eyes

·         Ten different types have been found by researcher[1][2]

Ocular:

·        Second most common

·        Mainly affects the eyes

·        People with it have pigmentation, but their skin, eye color, and hair is sometimes lighter

·        Five different types have been found by scientists

·        Very sensitive to sunlight[3][4]

 

An eye of someone with Ocular Albinism

http://209.157.64.200/focus/f-news/1884044/posts

X-linked Ocular:

·         Most common in males

·         The gene that causes it is inherited from the mother

·         Causes visual disabilities[5]

 

Tyrosinase-negative Oculocutaneous:

·         Also called Type 1A

·         Most severe form of albinism

·         No pigment in hair, skin, and eyes

·         Causes vision problems

·         People are very sensitive to the sun[6]

 

Tyrosinase-positive Oculocutaneous:

·         Light hair, skin, and eye color

·         Less visual impairment[7]

 

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS):

·        Most common in Puerto Rican communities

·        1 out of every 1,800 people in Puerto Rico have HPS

·        Lack of pigmentation varies

·        Causes changes in vision

·        Eyes are blue or brown

·        Yellow, brown, or creamy white skin color

·        White, brown, or pale yellow hair

o   Always lighter than the rest of the people in their community

·        Increases chances of lung disease, kidney problems, and bleeding disorders[8][9]     

A woman with Hermanksy-Pudlak Syndrome

http://www.kathrynskeepsakes.com/

 

Chediak-Higashi Syndrome:

·         Very rare

·         Interferes with white blood cells

·         Hurts the body’s ability to fight infections[10]

 

Black Locks Albinism Deafness Syndrome (BADS):

·         Very rare

·         Identified by a black lock of hair on the forehead

·         Causes deafness from birth[11] 

 

Piebaldism:

·         Also called Partial Albinism

·         Causes patches of white hair

·         Causes spots of lighter skin[12]

A girl with Piebaldism

 

http://www.consultantlive.com/display/article/10162/45534?verify=0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Footnotes

  1. "Albinism." World of Health. Ed. Brigham Narins. Online. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2007. Science Resource Center. Gale. 27 October 2009
  2. Knopper, Melissa. "Albinism." Gale Encyclopedia of Genetic Disorders. Ed. Brigham Narins. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2005. Science Resource Center. Gale. 27 October 2009
  3. Knopper, Melissa. "Albinism." Gale Encyclopedia of Genetic Disorders. Ed. Brigham Narins. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2005. Science Resource Center. Gale. 27 October 2009
  4. Blaser, Larry. "Albinism." Gale Encyclopedia of Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. Online. Detroit: Gale Group, 2008. Science Resource Center. Gale. 27 October 2009
  5. Knopper, Melissa. "Albinism." Gale Encyclopedia of Genetic Disorders. Ed. Brigham Narins. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2005. Science Resource Center. Gale. 27 October 2009
  6. Knopper, Melissa. "Albinism." Gale Encyclopedia of Genetic Disorders. Ed. Brigham Narins. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2005. Science Resource Center. Gale. 27 October 2009
  7. Knopper, Melissa. "Albinism." Gale Encyclopedia of Genetic Disorders. Ed. Brigham Narins. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2005. Science Resource Center. Gale. 27 October 2009
  8. Knopper, Melissa. "Albinism." Gale Encyclopedia of Genetic Disorders. Ed. Brigham Narins. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2005. Science Resource Center. Gale. 27 October 2009
  9. "Albinism." World of Health. Ed. Brigham Narins. Online. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2007. Science Resource Center. Gale. 27 October 2009
  10. Knopper, Melissa. "Albinism." Gale Encyclopedia of Genetic Disorders. Ed. Brigham Narins. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2005. Science Resource Center. Gale. 27 October 2009
  11. Knopper, Melissa. "Albinism." Gale Encyclopedia of Genetic Disorders. Ed. Brigham Narins. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2005. Science Resource Center. Gale. 27 October 2009
  12. Knopper, Melissa. "Albinism." Gale Encyclopedia of Genetic Disorders. Ed. Brigham Narins. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2005. Science Resource Center. Gale. 27 October 2009

Comments (2)

rryoung@... said

at 8:50 am on Oct 29, 2009

Great organization. Easy to read. Maybe you could find pictures of each type? Add those to teh visualization of each type of albinism.

Kathryn Snyder said

at 9:43 am on Nov 5, 2009

I thought it was really interesting that there were so many types. One that interested me in particular was the partial albinism, or piebaldism. It's so strange that only parts of someone's body could be affected.

You don't have permission to comment on this page.