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Causes 3

Page history last edited by Tyler Lasky 14 years, 8 months ago

Causes

 

Genetic Disorder

  • Cystic Fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disease.
  • The recessive gene must be inherited from both parents for it to become active in the child.
  • If the gene is only inherited from one parent, the child becomes a "carrier."
  • When the child is a "carrier" it will pass on the gene to its offspring. [1]

 

[2]

 

 

The Gene Itself

  • Called the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane gene.
  • This gene codes for the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR).
  • The CFTR makes it disrupts the way by which salt and water enter and leave cells that produce mucus.
    • The gene normally directs the production of certain proteins that are involved in helping ions cross internal and external membranes.
    • When the gene becomes mutated, most patients are missing 3 DNA subunits, and therefore the DNA molecule has a "gimpy" shape that lacks only one amino acid. 
    • Then, the ion transport problems cause a build up of mucus in the respiratory tract.

 [3]

  • The mucus produced (which is much more thick and salty) inhibits the body from keeping lungs and other organs clean.[4] 

 

  [5]

 

Prevention

  • To avoid having a child with the Cystic Fibrosis disease, a genetic disorder test can take place to figure the chances of having offspring with CF. (Prior to pregnancy)[6]

 

Footnotes

  1. "Cystic Fibrosis- What Increases Your Risk." WebMD. 26 Jun 2007. Healthwise, Web. 1 Nov 2009. .
  2. "Inheritance of Cystic Fibrosis (CF)." What is Cystic Fibrosis?. Web. 27 Oct 2009. .
  3. "Chromosomal Location of a Gene." Genetics Home Reference. 30 Oct 2009. U.S. National Library of Medicine, Web. 2 Nov 2009. .
  4. "Cystic Fibrosis- Cause." WebMD. 26 Jun 2007. WebMD, Web. 27 Oct 2009. .
  5. "Cystic Fibrosis." Illinois. July 2009. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Web. 1 Nov 2009. .
  6. "Cystic Fibrosis- What Increases Your Risk." WebMD. 26 Jun 2007. WebMD, Web. 27 Oct 2009. .

Comments (3)

Jacob Halbert said

at 10:18 am on Nov 4, 2009

i like the picture of the family tree because it shows how cistic fibrosis is inherited but our wiki is still better than your.

Ashley Gonzalez said

at 10:33 am on Nov 4, 2009

the pictures help to understand the disorder is passed on to an offsrping.

Zachary McCormack said

at 10:48 am on Nov 4, 2009

Well Jacob, I believe you meant to say yours* but then your statement wouldn't be true.

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