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Addams, Jane

Page history last edited by PBworks 15 years, 10 months ago

 

 Jane Addams

 

(1860 - 1935)

 

Jane Addams

www.infed.org/thinkers/et-addams.htm

 

 

"America's future will be determined by the home and the school. The child becomes largely what he is taught; hence we must watch what we teach, and how we live."

 

 

Personal Life

 

Jane Addams was born in 1860 in Cedarville Illinois. Her mother died when she was just two years old and she was raised by her father, John Huy Addams, who was friends with Abraham Lincoln. Her father taught her that a womans education should make her a better wife and mother, but Jane wanted more. She attended Rockford College and was one of the first American women to graduate from college. Addams went to Europe with a friend, Ellen Gates Starr, where they visited Toynbee Hall in London. This trip inspired Addams to create a settlement house in Chicago, Illinois.

 

 

Ellen Gates Starr

www.uic.edu/jaddams/hull/artlifeexhibit/art.html

 

 

Jane Addams had health problems throughout her life. When she was young she had spinal problems which were thought to be either a congenital defect, abscesses of the spine, and the result of tuberculosis. She had a heart attack in 1926 her health became even worse. She died on May 21, 1935, in Chicago.

 

Historical & Political Impact

 

YouTube plugin error

 

In 1889 Jane Addams opened the Hull House at the corner of Halsted and Polk Streets in Chicago Illinois. Addams and Ellen Starr leased this house from Charles Hull. The purpose of the home was "to provide a center for a higher civic and social life; to institute and maintain educational and philanthropic enterprises and to investigate and improve the conditions in the industrial districts of Chicago". Clarence Darrow appeared at Hull House for lectures.

 

 

Immigrant children at Hull House.

us.history.wisc.edu/hist102/photos/html/1028.html

 

Jane Addams was opposed to US entry in the first world war. Because of this, she was kicked out of the Daughters of the American Revolution. However, she was an assistant to President Herbert Hoover in providing relief for the women and children living in enemy countries during the war.

 

Named In Her Honor

 

  • Jane Addams Memorial Tollway in Illinois.
  • Jane Addams Children's Book Awards.
  • Jane Addams Elementary School.

 

 

 

 

                                                                                      

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/chicago/peopleevents/p_addams.html                              www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/USAhullhouse.htm

 

 

 

 

Worksheet:

 

Jane Addams.doc 

 

 

Sources 

 

 

 

 

Back to List of Prominent Individuals

 

 

 

 

Page created by:  Rachael L.

Avon High School, Avon, Indiana

Date created: March 21, 2008

 

M=4

 

Comments (8)

Anonymous said

at 7:38 am on Mar 27, 2008

i like your font and pics and VIDEO, RACHAEL!!!
NOT AS GOOD AS MINE, BUT YOU SHOULD BE USED TO IT BY NOW!!!

Anonymous said

at 3:51 pm on Apr 6, 2008

The information about the Hull House and its effect of society could have been a little stronger, but I like the way you showed Addams' versitility and her involvement in many social activities.

Anonymous said

at 7:09 am on Apr 7, 2008

Nice Page, the way its set up makes it easy to find information. The place you talked about how Addams was against the entering into the World War was interesting, but it would have been a little better if there was some more infromation cause it is interesting but its just stops.

Anonymous said

at 7:10 am on Apr 7, 2008

I really liked how all of your links showed relevence, and the video in particular really caught my attention. I really enjoyed how you showed Jane Addams as more than just the founder of the Hull House, but I also think that some more information on some of her other activities could be helpful.

Anonymous said

at 7:34 am on Apr 7, 2008

I really liked your Hull House video. I thought it was very informative in pointing out the major points in the history of the House without detouring to less important facts. There could have been some more information reguarding her specific role in the Hull House. I liked how you outlined different activities the House offered on your second page on the Hull House.

Anonymous said

at 7:27 am on Apr 10, 2008

I really liked your wiki. I can't believe such a strong mother figure for the industrial areas of Chicago actually lost her mother at age two. Good Job!

Anonymous said

at 7:33 am on Apr 10, 2008

I liked your wiki overall in terms of design and creativity (the video was very interesting!), but I think you could've added a little more explanation as to why she had such a big impact on history. Other than that, good job!

Anonymous said

at 7:22 am on Apr 11, 2008

The information was you had was very to-the-point. I was a bit confused about why you chose to say she died before you stated her accomplishments though. Good hard facts.

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